“Can You Succesfully Follow My Written Procedure?”


Surprising and insightful results are in from part two of following eighth grade students’ “written procedure for a unique and unusual structures” in Mrs. Hutching’s Science classes. 

Recently, eighth grade students were given supplies to create their own structure and were asked, “Can you write a procedure that can be followed by your classmates [to successfully build your created structure]?” 

The engaged students built their own structure, wrote directions (or procedure) for building it and then proceeded to part two – they gave their written procedures to another classmate to see if their directions could indeed be followed by a classmate to successfully build the given structure.

Here are some examples of the students’ written procedures.

Mrs. Hutchings reports that while it was fun listening to the kids try to build one another’s structures, no one had a successful build when following the given procedure!

So what happened which resulted in the unsuccessful peer builds? Students had to answer analysis questions that may provide insight into this question.

 

 

Mrs. Hutchings reports that while it was fun listening to the kids try to build one another’s structures, no one had a successful build when following the given procedure!

So what happened which resulted in the unsuccessful peer builds? Students answer analysis questions to provide insight into this question. Excellent answers students! (Click on the pictures to make them larger.)

Science Lesson Lets Students Question, “Is This Prey or Predator?”


Are you the prey…or the predator?

Third grade students took their Science lesson to the basketball courts as they played a great game involving becoming either the prey or the predator.

Mrs. Hubble says, “It was a real hit!”

This engaging game of Tag incorporated what students are learning about food chains in Science.

The kids and teachers split into groups – producers, consumers and decomposers.

The producers were not able to move until a primary consumer – the prey – tagged them. Then, they became a team trying to avoid the secondary consumers – the predators. Once the kids were tagged by a predator, they now had to work together to avoid the decomposers.

 

 

 

How Does Talking on Banana Phones….Relate to the Scientific Method?


Eighth grade students in Ms. Hutchings Science classes are using bananas as phones….but it’s all part of learning the Scientific Method!

In a very creative means, the students tried to solve eight puzzles in order to escape from the “Escape Room: Scientific Method Version”.

This group of four solved all but one of the puzzles…

Ohno! These groups didn’t “escape” yet!

This group “escaped” – they solved all eight puzzles!


Whether they “escaped” or not, these eighth graders sure learned about the Scientific Method!

We’re Building What??


Can you write a procedure that can be followed by your classmates? That’s what 8th grade students are going to figure out in Ms. Hutching’s Science classes!

Students are busy working today to build unique and unusual structures. Then, they will write down how to build the structure they made. Check out how engaged the kids are – they want to make sure that their own procedures can successfully build their structure!

So, what’s the answer to the objective question asked? Tune in soon when students will pass their written procedures on to another classmate to see if their directions can indeed be followed by a classmate to successfully build the given structure.

These students sure are having fun with this creative-thinking process. Wow – what a great lesson!